Advocacy Statements & Campaigns

Advocacy statements, examples of the importance of the humanities, and news about the past, present, and future of the humanities: 4Humanities provides a platform for endorsing the importance of research, teaching, innovation, and creative renewal in the history, language, literature, philosophy, the study of cultures, and other areas that help society focus on human values and needs.

See also the other materials gathered in our “Voices For the Humanities” section.

Scott Newstok, “The Crafts of Freedom”

« A Humanities, Plain & Simple Post » by Scott Newstok and Chapter16.org

Martin Luther King Jr.’s Mountaintop speech was more than brilliant rhetorical art; it was also the culmination of a lifetime spent in intense and extensive reading.

On April 3, 1968, Martin Luther King Jr. was summoned to the Bishop Mason Temple in Memphis to address the striking sanitation workers and their supporters. King wasn’t scheduled to speak at the rally, but Reverend Ralph Abernathy, sensing the crowd’s disappointment, had persuaded King to come from the Lorraine Hotel to make a few remarks […]

Take a Survey on Perceptions of “Public Humanities” at Your Institution

The Public Humanities Group affiliated with the Consortium of Humanities Centers and Institutes (CHCI) seeks respondents from higher-education institutions for an online survey gauging contemporary perspectives about the “public humanities.” The questionnaire (designed to take between 10 and 15 minutes to complete) inquires into how important the public humanities are at various institutions; what kinds of activities faculty members think contribute to the public humanities; the percentage of time that educators spend on such activities; and the impact educators believe various public humanities activities and media outlets to have. (More) (Take the survey)

THE DANCE INITIATIVE: An NY6 Fellow Blog

NY6 Think Tank Fellow, Danielle Iwata, from Colgate University launches her Blog. This blog will feature profiles of students, professors, and alumni who have been involved with dance in an effort to encourage others to consider dance in a more serious light. It will also display photographs and videos from my work with the Colgate Dance Initiative, which aim to showcase the talent and passion of students on campus, with the hopes that we can garner a greater appreciation for our art.

Phronēsis and the End of the Liberal Arts

After more than a decade as faculty and a few years now as associate provost at the category of institution perhaps most under attack in conversations about higher education in America—small, private, selective, liberal arts—my thinking tends to be focused on defending a model of higher education derided in the popular press as “elite,” “impractical,” “ineffective,” or worse. The most prominent such argument of late, of course, was Newsweek’s mid-September 2012 series on “The College Bubble,” headlined by Megan McArdle’s “Is College a Lousy Investment?” (hint: yes . . . for some).

The Liberal Arts and the Fate of American Democracy

In the democracy of ancient Athens and the republic of ancient Rome, freedom was only for the few. Slaves, servants, and women had to toil so that free men could cultivate their minds, participate in the government, and enjoy the highest goods of human life—in short, so they could learn and practice the liberal arts.